I’ve Got Your Number

Social Security Administration Warns Against Scams

Dec 16, 2018 |

rSocial Security Scam

The Social Security Administration (SSA) reports a dramatic increase in phone scams. Senior citizens are targets for scammers claiming to be from the SSA. The reason for the call? To tell the senior his/her Social Security number has been suspended. The caller states there has been fraudulent or criminal activity with the card. The number is suspended to protect the real card holder.

“They say to call a number to clear it up — where they’ll ask you for personal information,” according to the Federal Trade Commission. “The caller pretends to be protecting you from a scam while he’s trying to lure you into one.”

The SSA does not suspend Social Security numbers. Not for any reason. There is no cost to reinstate it. Despite the caller’s claims, it’s a scam.

If you receive a call from an alleged SSA representative, use a free reverse phone book app for iPhone to verify the number. Some scammers spoof the SSA’s customer service number — 1-800-772-1213 — to take the scam a step further.

SSA Warns Citizens

“Unfortunately, scammers will try anything to mislead and harm innocent people, including scaring them into thinking that something is wrong with their Social Security account and they might be arrested,” said Acting Inspector General of Social Security, Gale Stallworth Stone.  “I encourage everyone to remain watchful of these schemes and to alert family members and friends of their prevalence.  We will continue to track these scams and warn citizens so that they can stay several steps ahead of these thieves.”

Protect Yourself

  • The SSA rarely, if ever, calls people on the phone. They communicate by mail.
  • Be aware that the SSA will not make threats.
  • Do not give them your bank account number.
  • Don’t give out your Social Security number.
  • Ignore demands from automated calls.
  • Never give or confirm information.
  • Don’t assume the call, text, or email is legitimate. Again, contact people by mail.
  • Check all phone numbers using an iPhone reverse cell search app.
  • Do not engage the person on the phone.

Staying Safe

  • Block phone numbers you suspect to be fake.
  • Contact government agencies directly in person, through verified phone numbers, or through their website.
  • Contact government agencies directly, using telephone numbers and website addresses you know to be legitimate.

If someone has tried to steal your personal information by pretending to be from the government, report it to the FTC. Also, report suspicious calls to the SSA’s Office of the Inspector General at 1-800-269-0271 or online.

Kidnapping Phone Scam: How To Protect Your Family

Oct 31, 2017 |

You might think that phone scams aren’t something you need to worry about. Yes, you may have received weird calls in the past, but you’d never fall for any of them. There’s the IRS scam and free giveaway scams, but it’s pretty evident to you that these are scams. What if you got a different type of call though, one where someone claimed to have kidnapped your loved one. What would you do? The kidnapping phone scam is the latest (and scariest) phone scam happening in the United States.

What Is The Kidnapping Phone Scam?

The kidnapping phone scam targets families. In this scam you will get a call from someone claiming to have your loved one, usually a son or daughter. You may hear screaming in the background and the caller may know personal information like family members’ names and the area that you live in, all this makes their call more believable.

The caller will demand you wire them money immediately, or your family member will be injured or even worse killed. This is all designed to make you panic.

The caller will often get the information on you and your family from social media.

Protecting Yourself From This Scam

The best way to protect yourself from this frightening scam is to keep your social media accounts private and only share information with people you know and trust online. Refrain from publishing posts that divulge a lot of information publicly.

Another thing that you can do to protect yourself is keep a cool head, although this is very difficult to do.

  • Ask the caller personal questions about the person that the person they say they have would only know.
  • Try to get in touch with the person they say they have. While on the phone with the caller try to text the person they say they have or get someone else to call the person that they claim is kidnapped.
  • Contact the police. Though the caller will tell you not to contact authorities, be sure to contact them.

If you ever get a call like this be sure to call your local authorities immediately. You can also filter your calls that you receive by running them through a white pages iPhone app. These apps will help you see if there are any phone scams associated with a certain phone number. There are many option in the App Store and in Google Play so give a few a try!